ICT and Computing

Computing

In September 2014, Computing replaced ICT as a national curriculum subject, across all key stages. Computing is concerned with how computers and computer systems work, their design and programming, how to apply computational thinking, and how to best use information technology. The curriculum aims to give pupils a broad education that encourages creativity and equips them with the knowledge and skills to understand and change the world.

The new curriculum has three major strands:

Digital literacy: which is the ability to effectively, responsibly, safely and critically navigate, evaluate and create digital artefacts using a range of digital technologies. Digital artefacts can take many forms, including digital images, computer programs, spreadsheets and booklets.

Computer Science: is the scientific and practical study of computation; applied to the solution of problems.

Information Technology: is concerned with how computers and telecommunications equipment work and how data is stored, manipulated, retrieved and transmitted.

All students will follow a programme of study based upon the Computing National Curriculum.

Key Stage 4 (GCSE)

We currently offer two GCSE qualifications, ICT and Computer Science.

The ICT GCSE is the Edexcel linear course (2IT01) which has a course work element and one exam paper, which is taken at the end of Year 11:

  • Paper 1: Living in a Digital World – 1 hour 30 minutes (40%)
  • Controlled Assessment: Using Digital Tools – 40hours (60%)

The Computer Science GCSE is the OCR course which is eBacc recognized and comprises two controlled assessments, an investigation task and a programming project, and two exam papers, which are taken at the end of Year 11:

Component 1: Computer Systems – This is assessed by a written 1½ hour examination at the end of Year 11 and is worth 40% of the overall marks. You will study the following topics; systems architecture; memory; storage; wired and wireless networks; network topologies, protocols and layers; system security; system software and ethical, legal, cultural and environmental concerns.

Component 2: Computational thinking, algorithms and programming – This is assessed by a written 1½ hour examination at the end of Year 11 and is worth 40% of the overall marks. You will study the following topics; algorithms; programming techniques; producing robust programs; computational logic; translators and facilities of programming languages and data representation.

Component 3: Programming project – This component is by Non-Exam Assessment (NEA) and used to be called controlled assessment.  It is worth 20% of the overall marks and the task can only be started in year 11.  In Year 10, you will create programs using the high level Python programming language so you will be ready to tackle the NEA task in Year 11.  The task involves investigation and analysis; solution design; development (coding the solution); testing and evaluation; and you have 20 hours in lesson time to complete the set task.

 

Key Stage 3

Students will complete the following units of work, which are project based during Key Stage 3. There is a degree of overlap in this academic year as students transition to the new curriculum.

Year 7

  1. Introduction to Computing
  2. All about me (photo editing, animation and web design)
  3. E-Safety
  4. Game Design (Scratch)

Year 8

  1. Introduction to Computing – Computer Fundamentals
  2. Binary and Cryptography
  3. Problem solving and programming (Python)
  4. Spreadsheets and modeling

Year 9

  1. Introduction to Computing – Computer Fundamentals
  2. Problem solving and programming (Python)
  3. Networks & Security
  4. Programming BBC Micro:bit
  5. Databases